Muscadine

$30.00
Availability: Out of stock

Available for curbside pickup only.

Tree Description: The muscadine grape is native to the southeastern United States and is found in the wild from Delaware to the Gulf of Mexico, and westward to Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Many older varieties were selections from the wild, but the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station and the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture have introduced a number of improved varieties that have become standard cultivars. The four varieties listed above are all self fertile, and they fruit well throughout South Florida. Avg. Height x Width: Slow growing vine grows to size of trellis. Varieties: Florida Frye, Granny Val, Tara, and Triumph. Season: Summer and fall.

Scientific Name: Vitis spp.

Common Name: Grape, Scuppernong

Family: Vitaceae

Origin: North America

Distribution: Muscadines are well adapted to the warm, humid conditions of the southeastern
U.S. Its lack of frost hardiness also limits it to this same region, except for some West Coast
locations.

History: It has been extensively cultivated since the 16th century. Many older varieties
were selections from the wild, but the Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station and the U.S.
Dept. of Agriculture have introduced a number of improved varieties that have become
standard cultivars. The earliest named variety was Scuppernong, found growing wild in
northeastern North Caroline in 1810 by Dr. Calvin Jones. 

Importance: Muscadine grapes are fat free, high in fiber and they are high in antioxidants, especially ellagic acid and resveratrol. Ellagic acid has demonstrated anticarcinogenic properties in the colon, lungs and liver of mice. Resveratrol is reported to lower cholesterol levels and the risk of coronary heart disease.