Custard Apple

$15.00
Availability: Out of stock

Available for curbside pickup only.

Tree Description: The trees are large and spreading, shaded by large, green drooping
leaves. The tree produces several trumpet shaped flowers and of these flowers, only a small
number will contain fruit. The Fruit takes between 20 and 25 weeks to reach maturity in sub-tropical climates where the days are not too hot and the nights not too cold. They have a thick creamy custard-like pulp that can be pink, red or white. The fruit have a pleasant flavor and aroma, and they are best eaten out of hand or in ice cream. Avg. Height x Width: 20' x 15'. Season: Late winter to spring. Damage Temp: 28 - 30 F.

Scientific Name: Annona reticulata

Common Name: Custard Apple

Family: Annonaceae

Relatives: Cherimoya, soursop, sugar apple, ilama, atemoya 

Origin: West Indies to Central America & South Mexico

Distribution: Distributed in early times through Central America to southern Mexico. It has been cultivated and adapted as far south as Peru and Brazil. It is normally grown in the Bahamas and sometimes in Bermuda and southern Florida. Culinary Uses: In India, the fruit is eaten only by the lower classes, whole.

History: The custard apple is believed to be a native of the West Indies but it was carried in early times through Central America to southern Mexico. It has long been cultivated and naturalized as far south as Peru and Brazil. It is commonly grown in the Bahamas and occasionally in Bermuda and southern Florida.

Importance: Crushed leaves from this tree are thought to help
cure abscesses and ulcers. The unripe fruit is dried, crushed and fights against diarrhea
and dysentery. The bark is very harsh and is taken as a tonic and also as a remedy for
diarrhea and dysentery. Also, remains of the root bark are filled around the gums to
relieve toothache.